The Jerusalem Post: For those looking to explore Israel, emerging cities

The Jerusalem Post: For those looking to explore Israel, emerging cities

The Jerusalem Post: For those looking to explore Israel, emerging cities

April 26, 2016

By Shaina Oppenheimer

 

Integral to the choice of coming to Israel is the eagerness to give back to its people. Masa hopes to inculcate a sense of shared responsibility.

Every year, Masa Israel Journey enables thousands of young Jewish adults to come to Israel on various programs and experience the country as a local, diving deep into Israeli culture. However, the dynamic of these programs is starting to change; as more participants gravitate towards smaller cities, the focus is shifting from “my Israel” to “our Israel.”

 

A service and learning program incorporating gap years, study abroad, volunteer work and other post-graduate work contexts, Masa is starting to radiate waves of change throughout the Jewish community in moderately-sized metropolises, such as Beit She’an, Petah Tikva and Beersheba.

 

Read the full story on JPost.com. 

The Jerusalem Post: Hey America, 'ma Nishtana?'

The Jerusalem Post: Hey America, 'ma Nishtana?'

The Jerusalem Post: Hey America, 'ma Nishtana?'

April 24, 2016

By Liran Avisar, CEO of Masa Israel Journey

 

Today, there are more options available than ever before for young people to experience Israel, whether for days, weeks, months, or an entire year.

Every spring, Jewish people across the United States and around the world sit at a table with their friends and family to retell the story of our exodus from Egypt. The first leg of our journey back in time begins with the “Ma Nishtana” (“What has changed?”), also known as the Four Questions.

 

As we prepare to retell the story of the liberation of the Israelites and the birth of the Jewish people, it is also worth exploring the current state of our Tribe. This Passover, I have four slightly different questions for the American Jewish community.

 

These are the four major questions that are worth asking:

 

1. How can we increase young American Jews’ interest in Jewish life and Israel? 

 

If you just read the headlines, it might seem that engagement is on the decline and anti-Israel activities are expanding. But the sky isn’t exactly falling.

 

One thing we do know is that it takes a transformative Israel experience with a lasting impact for Jewish young adults to reestablish, or even establish for the first time, their personal connections to the Jewish people and to Israel – to discover the Tribe.

 

Now, I am not talking about a single event, happening, or “aha” moment. Though for some it may only take one spark to reignite the Jewish fire inside. I’m not talking about the classic structure of organized Israel trips that include a bus tour of the country’s sites like Masada and Yad Vashem, meeting Israelis, learning to count to 10 in Hebrew and stuffing your face with more hummus and falafel than you ever thought possible.

 

These are clearly cornerstones to a young Diaspora Jew’s introduction to Israel – the state, the land and the people. However, the personal moments, conversations and observations enabled by a long-term Israel experience are the lasting connections that help our young people realize they are part of something bigger than themselves – Am Yisrael.

 

I’m talking about your first trip to an Israeli mall, when you see the clothing and accessories covered in Stars of David instead of crosses. The grandmotherly women you encounter on the bus that offers unsolicited life advice and a bite of their snacks as if you were their own grandchild.

 

The way in which everyone wishes you “Shana Tova” in the fall, not because they’re religious or on the way to synagogue, but because it’s as natural as wishing someone “Happy Holidays” in the winter in America.

 

These are the local Israeli moments that stay with young Jews as they go back home and reflect on their experience and newfound connection to Israel and their Jewish identities. They are what make that connection durable.

 

2. How do we empower our students to authentically change the Israel conversation on college campuses across the country?

 

Young Jews who spend substantial amounts of time living in Israel are much more equipped to deal with the often hostile anti-Israel rhetoric and activities on campus. Having spent significant time in Israel, they know more about what’s happening (and has happened) on the ground. As such, they are not only able to take part in discussions and debates, but also have the knowledge and tools to change the tone and content of the conversations.

 

By bringing their own Israel stories and experience into campus dialogue, these students have the power to change a combative debate into a personal conversation. Having a trove of deeply personal experiences on the ground in Israel allows individuals to speak more knowledgeably and comfortably about Israel and its politics.

 

Spending significant time in Israel also enables young Jews to better differentiate between legitimate criticism and uninformed, misguided hatred. Rather than feeding into the entrenched, polarizing propaganda war, these students are empowered to respectfully confront dissenting viewpoints. They can go beyond traditional hasbara (public diplomacy) efforts and pro-Israel talking points to have nuanced and intellectual conversations about the reality of the challenges facing the State of Israel, its leadership and its people.

 

3. What will the US Jewish community’s professional and lay leadership look like in 10 years?

 

With the number of unaffiliated Jews in America on the rise, one might think that the American Jewish community’s professional and lay leadership is shrinking or narrowing. However, the pipeline is actually expanding. One key indicator of young Jews who remain engaged and take on leadership roles in Jewish life are those who have spent an extended amount of time in Israel.

 

The variety of opportunities to spend meaningful time in Israel has consistently grown over the past several years. Today, there are more options available than ever before for young people to experience Israel, whether for days, weeks, months, or an entire year.

 

In 10 years, the majority of Jewish adults in the United States will have participated in an immersive Israel experience. We are talking about an unprecedented reality for the American Jewish community.

 

Throughout my and my American colleague’s meetings with our numerous Jewish communal partners, from Jewish Federations to Hillels to synagogues and beyond, it becomes more and more apparent that alumni of immersive Israel experiences, particularly those who have spent between five to 12 months in Israel, are overrepresented in the Jewish professional world. They are everywhere, in every organization, and they are the future leaders of the Jewish community.

 

As a result, they are and will continue to be more determined to connect Israel to all aspects of Jewish life. More than anything, they will make Israel travel an integral part of Jewish life and Jewish experiences. That, my friends, is revolutionary.

 

In a decade, these same young leaders will hold influential positions, whether in the Jewish world, business world, the philanthropic world and beyond. They will be the ones calling the shots and making important decisions. To have their Israel stories to tell and an unforgettable experience to look back on will mold these discussions and decisions before they even begin.

 

4. Yalla, nu, when are you coming?

 

Originally published in The Jerusalem Post.

5 Ways to Explore Environmentalism in Israel

<div class="masa-blog-title">5 Ways to Explore Environmentalism in Israel</div>

From desalination to solar energy, irrigation, and literally making the desert bloom, Israelis know a thing or two about green tech and sustainability.


Masa Israel Journey’s environmental programs provide academic, volunteer, and professional opportunities for young adults to gain hands-on experience in sustainable building, organic farming, permaculture, and more.


In honor of this year's Earth Day, grab your hiking boots and get ready for one of Masa Israel’s incredible environmental experiences:


Arava Institute for Environmental Studies

alt="arava institute for environmental studies kibutz ketura"

Located on Kibbutz Ketura in Israel’s Negev desert, the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies is the Middle East’s premier research and environmental studies institution. Accredited by Ben-Gurion University, the Arava Institute brings together students from America, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, and from around the world to study environmental ethics and policy, ecology, water management in the Middle East and sustainable agriculture. Students also participate in a unique weekly Peace-Building and Environmental Leadership Seminar.


Eco-Israel

alt="eco israel hava and adam farm"

Eco-Israel combines coursework and hands-on fieldwork to give participants an in-depth experience in sustainable living and permaculture. Upon completion of the program, participants receive an internationally recognized certificate in permaculture design. 

 

Eco-Israel also emphasizes community-development as participants live and work together on the Hava and Adam Farm, Israel’s first multidisciplinary center for sustainable living and education, just outside of Modi'in.

 

LaMidbar: Desert Learning Community

alt="lamidbar desert learning community kibbutz neot semadar"

LaMidbar offers participants the unique opportunity to pursue environmental and artistic interests. Located on Kibbutz Neot Semadar in the Negev, LaMidbar allows participants to truly immerse themselves in the kibbutz community. Working with kibbutz members and program staff, participants gain experience in organic farming. Participants may also choose to participate in an apprenticeship in carpentry, metal work, stained glass, pottery, weaving and other media with local artisans in the kibbutz Art Center.

 

Tel Aviv University MA in Environmental Studies

alt="tel aviv university"

Tel Aviv University’s Porter School of Environmental Studies offers a three-semester MA in Environmental Studies, taught in English. This multidisciplinary program emphasizes the unique geographic and geopolitical challenges facing Israel and the broader Middle East. Courses cover a broad array of topics including sustainable development, marine conservation, and environmental policy. The program specializes in water issues, one of Israel’s most pressing environmental challenges, from both a scientific and political approach.

 

Environmental Internships

alt="masa israel environmental internship"

Looking for an environmental internship? Our internship programs offer a wide variety of opportunities for college graduates to gain hands-on work experience in environmental nonprofits, green tech companies, government agencies, and more. Click here to browse available positions.

 

 

Masa Israel Alumni Fellow of the Week: Molly Radler

<div class="masa-blog-title">Masa Israel Alumni Fellow of the Week: Molly Radler</div>

alt="molly radler"After graduating, Molly did a Masa Israel Volunteer Program, for 10 months in the city of Akko, as well as various Druze villages in the North. There she taught English and other subjects in both formal and non-formal settings to young Jewish, Arab, and Druze teenagers. The connection Molly built with the students from different backgrounds was what lead her to want to further facilitate connections for students in the United States. Soon after she joined The David Project and became a Senior Campus Coordinator with, working with college campuses throughout the state of Florida. She helped guide pro-Israel college students to advocate for Israel on campus to the non-Jewish community, speaking on behalf of their own narratives and connecting those to their peers, making the Israel discourse on campus more inclusive and relatable.

 

Molly will be going to graduate school to pursue a Master's in Social Work with the Greater Rochester Collaborative Master of Social Work (GRC MSW) Program of Nazareth College and The College at Brockport, SUNY. 

 

 

What was the most meaningful aspect of your Masa Israel experience?


The most meaningful aspect of my Masa Israel experience was the network of people and connections I was able to take with me after my year with Masa. The bond that we formed while doing the truly amazing and unique work of our program is something that has bonded me to the group of my peers that I will carry with me for the rest of my life. In addition, Masa provided opportunities to connect with other Masa participants throughout the whole country of Israel, and some of my closest friends and some of the most inspiring people I have met are ones I met on Masa.

 

What inspired you to become a Masa Israel Alumni Fellow?


I have become a very passionate advocate for Masa and have actively been suggesting that my students and friends apply for Masa programs. I was very active in all the opportunities that Masa provided in addition to my actual program, and love to share my experience with others to hopefully get them involved as well. I hope to help connect the network of Masa alumni across the country in years to come after their volunteership, as well as advocate for many other Jewish people to be able to have a similar experience.

 

Each Masa Israel Alumni Fellow is required to create an Impact project to bring back to their local community, either to increase local alumni involvement or help recruit new participants for Masa Israel programs. What ideas do you have for your Impact project, should you be chosen as a Fellow?

 

I would love to create a network between the various Israel and Jewish organizations for young adults to learn about ways to get back to Israel through Masa. In Boston, there are already things in place for this to be successful, but on a very broad scale. If chosen I would love the opportunity to use this as a resource to start a specific project for students to find their perfect program to get back to Israel and explore their Jewish identity and connection to Israel through Masa.

 

To learn more about Masa Israel Volunteer Programs, Click Here. 
 

 

Masa Israeli: The journey into yourself

<div class="masa-blog-title">Masa Israeli: The journey into yourself</div>

By Jane Mustova, PMP Nativ Technion
 
A considerable number of people believe that those who wander are lost, however I believe that it is through traveling that you discover your true self.  With that being said, I believe that the main goal of Masa Israeli is to help each of us realize what we really want and where we stand in life.
 
“Sometimes, reaching out and taking someone’s hand is the beginning of a journey. At other times, it is allowing another to take yours.”- Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration
 
Throughout our Masa Israeli journey, we hiked along Jerusalem hills, trekked through the desert, strolled along the ancient streets of the Old City, built at the times of King David. We visited the place where David conquered Goliath, walked the streets of Tel Aviv and even spent Shabbat in Jerusalem. And each day, as we were discussing questions such as “Why are we here?” and “What does Judaism means for each of us?”, we started noticing how much do we actually have in common. Aside from the obvious fact that we all came from the FSU, we found that we shared much more: family history, interests, traditions, and beliefs. It was incredible to feel how over the course of a few days we went from being acquaintances to feeling like family.
 
One of the highlights of the trip was the night in the desert. Sitting around the fire, looking at the stars, we felt like characters of the Lion King movie, thinking how “the great kings of past look down on us” and although we have all been running away from our past, and our history, it is the time to learn from it.
 
While in Tel Aviv we attended a solo theatrical performance “Apples”, based on the story by Dina Rubina, and directed by Nadezhda Greenberg. The play tells the story of a typical Jewish family, whose history went through the devastating years of Second World War and the holocaust. This story raises the question of memory, which is universal to all of us, regardless of where we came from. When I was standing next to the Kotel in Jerusalem, I thought about my own family, particularly about my great-grandmother, who came to Jerusalem as a pilgrim, over a hundred years ago. Throughout history, there were people who were coming here, regardless of the politics, wars, and struggles. These people built the foundation on which the Israeli society stands todaya nation connected through language, culture, and the history of Jewish people.
 
In our fast-paced environment, full of hi-tech developments and scientific achievements, it is necessary to take a step back once in a while and think of the important things in life. This is what programs such as Masa Israeli are made for.
 
Masa Israeli is a beautiful journey, which leads you to your roots, gives you the opportunity to walk the paths of your ancestors, re-think why you are here and what your next step in life is. It is the chance to experience the individuality of each person, and at the same time, to feel as a part of something greater. All this is possible to due to the tremendous work of the talented guides and madrichim, as well, as the personal contribution of each participant.
 
Thanks to all of you! It was spectacular!
 
 
 

IDC - One Year MBA in English

http://www.masaisrael.org/sites/default/files/one%20year%20MBA%20pic.jpg

Program Description

IDC is offering a one year MBA program focusing on management of fast-growth, innovative companies. The program combines MBA content customized for management of high-growth companies, with study in the fields of innovation and entrepreneurship. The program comprises relevant practical experience, including the options of practicing in start-up firms, internships in different companies, or participation in practical projects with the guidance of lecturers and managers from the industry. Courses will be taught by the best lecturers IDC offers and by leading academics and practitioners in their fields.

The program’s goal is to provide students with managerial tools that will enable integration into the business world in growing companies, development of new opportunities and quick promotion of their professional careers. This MBA is suitable for students who possess a strong academic background and are interested in investing in a particularly intensive degree for a short period of time.

 

For more information, contact:

 

Israel & Abroad

Gabrielle Pittiglio
RRIS Admissions & Recruitment
+972 9 952 7658
RRIS.registrar@idc.ac.il

 

UK and Francophone Europe

Annette Bamberger
Director of Recruiting and Marketing
+44(0) 7783846852
bannette@idc.ac.il

 

Masa Israel Alumni Fellow of the Week: Samantha Shevgert

<div class="masa-blog-title">Masa Israel Alumni Fellow of the Week: Samantha Shevgert</div>

Samantha Shevgert knew she was Jewish but didn’t know what it meant to live a Jewish life. She decided to learn about her Jewish roots in a 10 ½ month Neve Yerushalayim Seminary in Jerusalem, Israel. During her time in Jerusalem, she learned about the importance of Judaism, Torah, and gained friendships for a lifetime. She also gained experience in her career while in Israel by volunteering every week in a Jewish nursing home using her Russian speaking skills to assist those in need.


After her Masa Israel Journey, Samantha returned to South Florida and has helped strengthen the Jewish community. Samantha’s knew found knowledge and connection with Judaism helped her start and become part of many Jewish organizations and communities. She is a founding member of the Moishe House Aventura, Chabad of Ft.Lauderdale, and Yehudi of South Beach. Her efforts in the Jewish community have surpassed the norm and have made her an outstanding leader in the Jewish community of South Florida.


Sam holds a BA in Public Health and Associates Degree in Occupational Therapy. Her experience in Israel has helped her with her career as an occupational therapist. She focuses in In-Patient Rehabilitation Hospitality as well as working with children with autism.
 

What was the most meaningful aspect of your Masa Israel experience?


Every moment of the Masa Israel experience was incredibly meaningful! These 10 months changed my life and shaped who I have become. Being able to spend an extended amount of time in Israel allowed me to not just learn about what it is to be Jewish and how to lead a Jewish life but also how to integrate it into who I am and live it. It truly shaped me; it was the catapult to my now Jewish involvement.


What inspired you to become a Masa Israel Alumni Fellow?


I applied to be a Masa Israel Alumni Fellow because being a part of the Masa experience myself it changed my life. I am so passionate about Israel and bringing awareness to people and learning about Judaism. I would love nothing more than to become a great leader in my community. I want to help send people to Israel to have as much of a meaningful experience as I did!


Each Masa Israel Alumni Fellow is required to create an Impact project to bring back to their local community, either to increase local alumni involvement or help recruit new participants for Masa Israel programs. What ideas do you have for your Impact project, should you be chosen as a Fellow?


I am a member of the Moishe House in Aventura, Florida. I would love to incorporate all of the Israel opportunities to that experience. Masa has a lot to offer to our house and we are able to use the house to spread the word on what Masa does!

 

 

Learn more about the Masa Alumni Fellows Program.

 

 

Masa Israel alumnae giving back to the world. #InternationalWomensDay

<div class="masa-blog-title">Masa Israel alumnae giving back to the world. #InternationalWomensDay</div>

In honor of International Women’s Day, we decided to highlight our fellow Masa Israel alumnae and their amazing accomplishments. Here at Masa we know our participants have the potential to not only make a difference in their own lives, but in the lives of others. Giving back is the focus this month and it’s the perfect time to mention a few alumnae who have done just that.

 

1. Kayci Merritté, Yahel Social Change Program 2014-2015 Alumna

 

 

“After my Masa Israel experience, I returned to my hometown of St. Louis to serve as an AmeriCorps member assisting in refugee resettlement. Once-a-week I pick up new arrivals from all of the world – Congo, Iraq, Cuba, the list goes on – from the airport and bring them to their new homes. Throughout the rest of my week, I help these new residents of my city access the medical care that they need. I’m not sure I would have applied for this position if it were not for my experiences in Ramat Eliyahu.”


Learn more about the Yahel Social Change Program.

 


2. Jamie Gold, Masa Israel Teaching Fellows 2012-2013 Alumna

 



“As a result of her Masa Israel Teaching Fellows experience, Jamie chose to pursue a career in Jewish education. Upon returning to Los Angeles, Jamie moved into the Moishe House in West L.A. and enrolled in the DeLeT program at Hebrew Union College. “Masa Israel Teaching Fellows is the only reason I was picked for the HUC program,” Jamie says. She believes it gave her the necessary Israel and teaching experiences to be a top-notch Jewish educator.”


Learn more about the Masa Israel Teaching Fellows Program.

 

3. Rachel Pope, MSIH 2011 alumna

 


“Rachel is completing a two year fellowship in Malawi. She is learning how to repair obstetric fistulas and working with the next generation of Malawian residents at the newly created Malawian OB/GYN residency program. Rachel is currently living in Lilongwe, Malawi and working for the government hospital, Kamuzu Central.”

 

Learn more about the The Medical School for International Health (MSIH).

 


4. Ashleigh Talberth, Pardes Insitute of Jewish Studies 2014-2015 Alumna

 


“A serial green-tech entrepreneur, Ashleigh has pioneered initiatives for a broad range of leading companies, startups, and institutions for over 12 years. She currently consults for emerging companies primarily in California and Israel, the world's leading green-tech and startup hot spots.” ("Israelcagreentech." Israelcagreentech. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Mar. 2016.)
 

Learn more about the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies. 

 

Masa Israel Alumni Fellow of the Week: Josh Entis

<div class="masa-blog-title">Masa Israel Alumni Fellow of the Week: Josh Entis</div>

Joshua Entis has a special place in his heart for the Jewish community around the world. After volunteering for Masa Israel Teaching Fellows in Netanya, Josh knew that his experience would remain a part of his life forever.

 

Becoming a Masa Alumni Fellow has encouraged Joshua to express his love and passion for Masa, the Jewish Community, and the State of Israel. Before his journey to Israel, Joshua's Jewish Identity was almost non-existent, and now, 2 years after returning, he feels more connected, educated, and part of a community more than ever before.

 

Currently Josh is living in Seattle, WA, he works as an account executive by day and a waiter by night. Joshua is always finding new ways to strengthen a strong set of values and beliefs to live by, while exploring his life path, where ever it leads.

 

What was the most meaningful aspect of your Masa Israel experience?

 

Having the opportunity to make a difference and add value to the lives of children in Netanya.

 

What inspired you to become a Masa Israel Alumni Fellow?

 

Being a Masa Alumni Fellow will allow my love and passion for the organization to shine. My experience with Masa changed the way I see the world. There are thousands of people who can help support Masa and even more who can benefit from the over 200+ Masa programs. Being a Masa Israel Fellow will help me spread that message. This opportunity will help me connect with the people who share the same values and beliefs; creating awesomeness!!

 

Each Masa Israel Alumni Fellow is required to create an Impact project to bring back to their local community, either to increase local alumni involvement or help recruit new participants for Masa Israel programs. What ideas do you have for your Impact project, should you be chosen as a Fellow?

 

One place to start would be the Hillel at the University of Washington. They host a  Shabbat Dinner every Friday night at their campus location. This is only for undergrads. This would be an unbelievable place to volunteer as a guest speaker. There can be an event planned (bowling, mini golf, something) that would take anyone who was interested to find out more about them and their interests, establish a relationship, and turn them into Masa participants. Jconnect would be another option too. They are post-college organizartion that caters to young professionals ages 22-31.

 

Learn more about the Masa Israel Alumni Fellows program.

 

Marisa Obuchowski