Haifa University - MA in Child Development

http://www.masaisrael.org/sites/default/files/MASA%20Program%20banner%20415X305%20-%20Child%20Developmen.jpg

Program Description

The International Master of Arts Program in Child Development was established with the goal of improving the lives of children at risk in developing countries around the world by training and promoting professional leadership that will advance various agendas to achieve this objective. The program is offered through the Faculty of Social Sciences in conjunction with the Center for the Study of Child Development and the International School, University of Haifa. Taught in English, the full-time, one-year program is designed to train the next generation of international experts who will focus on pressing questions regarding the nature of child development and how it applies to the lives of children and their families in developing countries.
This unique program equips future professionals with a comprehensive theoretical basis and an applied skillset that will be effective in influencing the well-being of children and their families in a positive manner.

 

Tuition and Service Fees $9,780 US
Accommodation $450 US per month

 

 

 

Go to program page on the University of Haifa website 

 

Read the program blog

 

 

Young Judaea - Tel Aviv Academy Plus

http://www.masaisrael.org/sites/default/files/wujss.jpg

Program Description

Welcome to TEL AVIV ACADEMY PLUS - A joint program between American Jewish University and YJ. On Tel Aviv Academy Plus, you get the best of both worlds: you will learn about contemporary issues in Israeli culture through top-notch academic studies while also interning with top Israeli companies. All of this is in vibrant Tel Aviv, a city that never stops!

TEL AVIV: The White City, The City That Never Stops. No matter what you are looking for, you will find it in Tel Aviv! On Tel Aviv Academy Plus, you will live in beautiful Israeli apartments in the heart of Florentin- the Brooklyn of Israel. Everything you could ask for is within reach in Florentin, from premiere restaurants to amazing bars and everything in between. You will also be a short bus ride from both the beach and the cultural center of town. By day, step into a thriving international business or arts environment. By night, step out and experience the best nightlife in the Middle East!

ACADEMY: Through Tel Aviv Academy Plus, you will take classes accredited by the American Jewish University in Los Angeles. You will study Hebrew, contemporary Israeli culture, and Jewish Religion and History, and more! Through the program's setup, all of Israel is your classroom.

PLUS: Gain real-world experience while you are still in school with a customized internship! With over 400 different options for placement, you will be able to experience your field first hand, supplement your academic studies with experiential learning, and give your resume a boost.

 

 

Haifa University - MPH in Global Health Leadership & Administration

http://www.masaisrael.org/sites/default/files/MASA%20Program%20banner%20415X305%20-%20MPH.jpg

Program Description

The University of Haifa’s International Master’s Program in Global Health Leadership and Administration is dedicated to providing students with a strong foundation from which to critically examine current global health challenges. The next generation of health care leaders will require a comprehensive understanding of society’s many facets and how they each relate to public health issues. They will also need to have sophisticated leadership skills in order to serve an ever more complex society, and to manage cross-cutting, multi-sectoral, top-down and bottom-up comprehensive programs, within and beyond the health services. In an increasingly integrated world marked by growing disparity, public health leaders will also need to be aware of how global and national forces affect health within and between national borders.
The Global Health Leadership and Administration program nurtures the required high levels of sophistication, excellent leadership and communication skills, and a deep knowledge of public and global health in order to prepare future practitioners and researchers for leadership roles in settings across the globe. The one-year program is taught in English over three consecutive semesters, from October through September.

 

Haifa University - MA in Jewish Studies

http://www.masaisrael.org/sites/default/files/MASA%20Program%20banner%20415X305%20-%20JewishStudies_0.jpg

Program Description

The International Master of Arts in Jewish Studies is a program in Jewish history, philosophy and thought. It offers a comprehensive combination of Judaic studies that weaves together Biblical and Talmudic Studies, Jewish History, Philosophy and Mysticism. The program’s focus extends from the Biblical to Modern era, and is taught by experts in the fields of Biblical studies, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Early and Late Antiquity, the Middle Ages, early Modern and Modern Jewish History and Thought. Our parallel Hebrew-language program draws over two-hundred students annually and we are now happy to be able to offer it to students from around the world.

 

What you will study


The year-long program will be taught over three semesters and includes a final examination. The courses are split according to three chronological groups: the Biblical period, Antiquity (the Rabbinic period); and the Medieval to Modern period. In order to obtain a master’s degree the student will need to accumulate 36 credits over three consecutive semesters. The credits may be made up from any of the three groups of his/her choice and include the following fields of study:


•         Biblical Studies
•         Dead Sea Scrolls
•         Judaism in Antiquity
•         Talmud and Midrash
•         Jews and Christians, from Antiquity to Early Modernity
•         Medieval Jewish History
•         Jewish Philosophy
•         Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism
•         Early Modern Cultural History
•         Genizah Studies

 

Tuition and Service Fees $9,780 US
Accommodation $450 US per month

 

Go to program page on the University of Haifa website

 

Read the program blog

 

 

Haifa University - MA in German & European Studies

http://www.masaisrael.org/sites/default/files/MASA%20Program%20banner%20415X305%20-%20GermanEU.jpg

Program Description

The Haifa Center for German and European Studies (HCGES) is a joint venture of the University of Haifa and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD – Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst). HCGES was founded in 2007 with the goal of exposing students, researchers, and the community at large to a rich spectrum of topics related to modern Europe, and Germany in particular, since 1945.

The international Master of Arts program in German and European Studies at the University of Haifa is being launched as part of the teaching activities of the HCGES. The MA program is designed to acquaint students with topics related to Germany and Europe, highlighting Jewish and Israeli perspectives as well as the relationship between the Middle East and Europe. The program is interdisciplinary and allows students to approach German and European studies from a variety of angles while providing students with the opportunity to engage with other departments for a well-rounded education.

Highlights

Track A (with MA Thesis)
Track B (with a final exam)

What Israeli Universities Does Masa Israel Partner With?

<div class="masa-blog-title">What Israeli Universities Does Masa Israel Partner With?</div>

Did you know that Masa Israel provides grants and need-based scholarships to students who study abroad in Israel?

 

Whether it's a semester abroad during undergrad or a masters program after college we can provide up to $7,500 in grants and need-based scholarships to make it easier for you to study abroad in Israel.
 

 

Tel Aviv University

Tel Aviv University, Israel’s largest and most comprehensive academic institution, boasts a diverse and dynamic student body and a faculty of nationally and internationally renowned scholars and scientists. It consistently ranks in the top 20 universities in the world in terms of scientific citations and among the top 100 universities internationally. It is conveniently located in the vibrant city of Tel Aviv, a start-up hub, a cultural capital with a thriving arts scene, rich history, and world-class museums and galleries, not to mention incredible nightlife and scenic beaches.

 


Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Hebrew University is an internationally renowned institution with a rich history. It’s Israel’s second-oldest university and home to the world’s largest Jewish studies library. Four of Israel’s prime ministers are among the university’s notable alumni. With an incredible location in Jerusalem, one of the most dynamic and historic cities in the world, you’ll learn as much outside the classroom as in it. Just walking through the city streets and looking at ancient walls and buildings is a lesson in archeology.

 

 

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is the oldest academic institution in the country and a world-class university with students from Israel and around the world. It is ranked among the world’s top 50 technological universities and has been recognized for being a leader in creating a special ecosystem that promotes innovation and entrepreneurship. It is home to three Nobel Laureates and is also the birth place of many of Israel’s most exciting tech innovations. To enhance its international presence, Technion has established academic partnerships, including: the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute for applied science being built in New York City; the planned cooperatively run Technion-Guangdong Institute of Technology (TGIT) with Shantou University being built in Shantou, Guangdong; and research laboratories in Singapore under the CREATE project of the National Research Foundation of Singapore.


Technion is located in Haifa, a diverse port city where you’ll find stunning views, the magnificent Baha’i Gardens, and amazing cultural diversity: Arab, Christian, and Jewish cultures have coexisted here for centuries. In recent years, Haifa has emerged as an “Israeli Silicon Valley” with a booming tech industry (Microsoft and Google set up shop here not so long ago).

 

 

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Ben-Gurion University is a pioneering teaching and research center with more than 19,000 students, a large campus, and a welcoming dorm life. Located in Beer-Sheva—a growing city on the edge of the Negev desert that retains the feel of an exotic, distant land—this university is a great choice for students who want more than just the “same old, same old.”

 

 

University of Haifa

The University of Haifa is one of Israel’s most diverse academic institutions, with a student body of Jews, Arabs, Christians, new immigrants and native Israelis, all deeply committed to social responsibility and academic excellence. It also offers state-of-the-art research centers and boasts a renowned faculty. A diverse port city located on the Mediterranean Sea, Haifa offers stunning views, the magnificent Baha’i Gardens, and amazing cultural diversity.

 

 

Arava Institute of Environmental Studies


The Arava Institute for Environmental Studies, located in Southern Israel, is the only institution which brings together students from America, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, and from around the world, to cooperatively study the region’s environmental challenges. Accredited through Ben-Gurion University, the Arava Institute houses academic programs, research centers, and international cooperation initiatives focusing on a range of environmental concerns and challenges.

 

 

IDC Herzliya

Study with world-renowned faculty, engage with students from around the world and enjoy a wide array of extracurricular activities.
The Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya was established twenty years ago as Israel’s first private university.  IDC Herzliya believes in ‘start-up academia’ and encourages its students to initiate, innovate, invent and create. Many successful startups in Israel today first came together on the IDC campus.

 

 

Bar-Ilan University

A world-class institution, Bar-Ilan University offers students a challenging and rewarding academic experience that emphasizes social responsibility and Jewish values. It’s currently the second-largest academic institution in Israel, with a dynamic student body and a renowned faculty.

 

The university is located just outside of vibrant Tel Aviv, a cultural capital with a thriving arts scene, rich history, and world-class museums and galleries, not to mention incredible nightlife and scenic beaches.
 

To learn more about Masa Israel's study abroad and post college programs, click here. 

 

Career Israel: Daniel Vapne Profile

<div class="masa-blog-title">Career Israel: Daniel Vapne Profile </div>

Career Israel participant Daniel Vapne gave us an insight on his Masa Israel Journey and how it helped him grow professionally. After getting his B.A in Exercise Science from Kennesaw State University, Daniel decided to take an internship with Medix, a private physical therapy clinic in Israel.


During his internship, he was able to apply his knowledge as well as skills from his college experience. His personal struggle and understanding of taking initiative makes him stand out as an exemplary leader of his community. He developed a passion for helping people.  Israel’s diverse population requires more than the typical Hebrew skills but the understanding of different cultures and languages as well. His commitment to gaining knowledge helped him bridge that gap.


Daniel gained more than just experience; he developed a plan to give back to people back home and Israel. We asked him some questions about his journey and how it shaped his Jewish identity as well as leadership skills.


How did you end up on a Masa Israel program?


I did Taglit Birthright in December of 2013. A Masa Israel rep came on the bus one day and said, “if you liked Taglit, there’s a longer term program you can do.” They explained that you can choose what you want to do and that there are many options.


I was very touched by the whole Israel experience, so as soon as I got home I did my research. I saw all of my options and thought it would be great to go back and work in Israel. It seemed like I’d get a more hands on experience than I would in the U.S.


I couldn’t treat patients in the U.S. like I did in Israel. In Israel, I did whatever the physical therapists told me to do. In the U.S., I would’ve just been an aid.


In Israel, I was able to use my critical thinking, create treatment plans and facilitate them for my patients. I worked in a multi-lingual environment, speaking English, Hebrew, and Russian.
I think the patients trusted me more. In the U.S., if you don’t have Doctoral degree in Physical Therapy, patients won’t take you seriously.


In Israel, your bosses give you as much opportunity as you want. It’s up to you to prove to them that you’re capable and able to do the job. I’m treated more as an equal than as a tool. It was there where I was able to get the experience that helped me in grad school. There I was exposed to more and actually worked with patients. Now I know how to approach the American population, but also those from other countries. I’ve learned how important the patient relationship is.

 


You said you treat patients in English, Hebrew and Russian. How are you able to do this?


Before I came on this program, I knew very minimal Hebrew. But after two weeks of ulpan and learning every day at work, on the bus to work and struggling to learn the language, I’m able to actually treat patients in three languages.


My Hebrew is still pretty minimal, but I’m able to communicate with patients and give them directions on exercises and their treatment. In a month-and-a-half of work I was able actually do this already.


And where did you learn Russian?


I grew up speaking Russian at home, and I’m really lucky that I was able to use those skills and talents in Israel. It’s not common in the U.S., at least in my experience, for my Russian to be so useful.

 

Did you have any experience working in PT before you came to Israel?


I worked at a few different clinics before. During and after college, I helped out in the sports medicine department at my college, working alongside trainers and sports doctors that treated student athletes, on both rehabilitation and injury prevention


I also worked at PT solutions, a physical therapy chain back home. I was an aid there and worked with great young physical therapists who were just a year or two out of grad school. They coached me through the grad school application process.


I mostly just observed what they did and asked as many questions as possible, but I utilized the knowledge I gained from working there in Israel.


I also volunteered at the local Jewish Home, where my grandma lives, and the hospital nearby with in-patient rehabilitation unit. I met a lot of great professionals there that actually motivated me to pursue this path even more.


So, did you defer grad school for a year to come to Israel?


No. Before I went to Israel, I started the application process and I got my first interview at NYU. I also got my first rejection letter four hours before that, so it was a nice surprise.


What was your involvement in the Jewish community, or Jewish life – if any – growing up?


I had mild involvement in Hillel on my college campus. There weren’t many Jews at my college. I also went to young professional events, and went to events at my synagogue.


I went to a modern orthodox Jewish high school and really found my Jewish identity there. I played basketball there and really felt like part of the community. Even though I was very secular, they really accepted me.


(As I said, I was really secular, so I learned a lot of traditions and values there. My parents are beginning to become more observant. They started keeping a kosher kitchen and my mom isn’t working on Shabbat anymore – she runs her own business teaching piano lessons, so it’s kind of a big step for her. My dad still wants to be secular and we’re fine this way. We have a nice Jewish balance at home and it’s nice to have Shabbat and stay at home together.


You say you grew up secular, how did you end up in a modern orthodox high school?


I got a scholarship for basketball and academics – I was really good at math and the school liked giving scholarships to kids in the community, even if they weren’t religious.


Does your connection to Israel also come from your high school experience?


I had a slight involvement in NCSY, but I’d say my Jewish involvement really increased after Taglit Birthright. I wanted to be more involved in the community. I do have some family in Israel, but really, this is my homeland. I feel more connected to Israel sometimes than the U.S.


What was it like living in Israel?


It was great because every day I was able to use my Hebrew and even if I couldn’t get my idea across, everyone knows English and can help me out. I also got to live in the city, I’ve never really lived ‘in the city’ before, so that was great. I lived with five other people, around my age, in the center of Tel Aviv!


And how did Career Israel treat you?


Career Israel was great and my madrichim (counselors/residential advisors) were great. I don’t know if you know Itzik, but he’s the best. He’s tried to help my girlfriend find a job in the U.S. so we can continue the romance after the program (she’s Canadian).


I’ve also learned a lot about myself and what I can give back to the community, as well as what the community can give me.  I made tons of new connections. That’s one of the reasons I loved Birthright. Being in a college that didn’t have much of a Jewish life – it’s what I felt like it was lacking. I was in a fraternity, I was in Hillel, I was involved in academic clubs, but I felt different. I was still a leader of all of these clubs and student groups, but I couldn’t relate to people on a deeper level.


When I told people I was coming to Israel, all of my professors told me to be careful. They didn’t understand that I felt safer in Israel than in the U.S. or in Atlanta. I feel more with my people here.

 

 

What do you think of the Leadership Summit ?


So far it’s great, I have a great group – I mean they’re not too bad (looking back at friends sitting behind us)


It’s really thought provoking and relates to something I’m personally working on. I have the tendency of not asking questions and just taking control. I’m trying to be more of a facilitator and understanding people’s perspectives. For one thing, not trying to control the conversation all the time and trying to see where they’re coming from and accept it. It’s something I was really lacking before as a student leader on campus. It made it hard for people to work with me. I’m trying to learn how to be a more adaptive leader and how to adapt to the group. You know, get a sense of personalities in the group and figure out my own role, instead of asserting myself and claiming a role first.


Something I also learned, especially from the speaker the other night, is to adapt to your audience – the people who you’re with, your coworkers. Not everything is set in stone. Things are done differently,in Israel than in the U.S. So I’m trying to find a role – it doesn’t have to be big – to try to make the group dynamic work.


How do you plan to stay involved in the Jewish community when you go back to the U.S.?


I did get a letter from the Atlanta Jewish community – the Jamie A. Tritt Family Foundation Volunteers an Action Leadership program from the Jewish Family and Career Services for the Young Adults Division of this organization to run events.


It’s very hard to tell what my involvement will be because I hope I won’t be in Atlanta for too long when I get home. I’ve always been close to the JCC there. It’s where I worked out and played basketball. It’s where my first job was; at the concession stand and then as a lifeguard. It helped me find my interests, professionally, in aquatic therapy and orthopedic therapy. That’s where it all started.


My long term goal is to open up physical therapy clinics in the U.S. and open one that’s more nonprofit in Israel, somewhere where people need access to that kind of care.
I’ve noticed here that the best care comes from private companies. There is public physical therapy but when I ask patients, they say the care isn’t here. I know it’s hard to have a clinic in Israel; that’s why I want the capital to come from running clinics in the U.S. to open something in Israel. I want to give back to the State of Israel in my own way, but it’s not easy. That’s one of the sad things about Israel: there is a struggle  for people to take risks and in order to take those risks and be successful you have to have the large amount of capital.


That’s what I want to give back to Israel – my knowledge of medicine – to help those going through something traumatic – get back to the way of life that they want.

 

Is there anything else you wantto share about your Masa Israel experience?

 

Growing up I had a communication disorder – I guess that’s what you call you it – I stuttered. Ever since I was in junior high I tried to put myself out there to overcome it so I could become a leader. I’ve always looked up to leaders – activists, politicians, etc. I worked really hard to overcome it. It still comes up when I’m really nervous like in job interviews and stuff.


Because of it, I’m always taking a strong role and working harder than the person next to me, putting in hours of preparation. This is what sort of made me a leader. This attribute that I thought I was lacking – I wanted to be able to be out spoken and be able to be a leader and inspire people to get out there and take action. It’s very important to me because growing up you get ridiculed for that. Now that I’m older I try to be eloquent and stand up for the people who can’t’ speak for themselves. So, that’s something that’s always been something close to my heart and every chance I get I try to work on it.


For example, the first day of the conference I volunteered to speak in front of 250 plus people. I try to get over that fear – it’s there for you to overcome it and it’s just another thing I’ve had to face in my life.


Also, and more related to the community thing, I tried getting extra scholarship from the Atlanta Jewish Federation, because I’d heard that some Federations do that, but they don’t give it. I found it very strange since it’s an affluent community. That’s something I’m trying to make happen because so many young people in Atlanta leave the community, but if they contribute more to this, these people will come back to Atlanta and give back to the community.

 
 

Medosteo

Program Description

What Mothers are saying about Masa Israel

<div class="masa-blog-title">What Mothers are saying about Masa Israel</div>

In the USA, Mother’s Day is a special holiday meant to celebrate your mother and shower her with compliments and gifts. Sometimes, a great gift can consist of you going on a long term program in Israel. In honor of Mother’s Day, our gift is to highlight how much impact a Masa Israel participant gives to their parent and the Jewish people. 

 

By Nancy Iankowitz

 

 

 

 

Happy Mother's Day from Masa Israel! 

 

To learn more about Masa Israel programs, click here. 

 

Out of Chaos, Total Clarity

<div class="masa-blog-title">Out of Chaos, Total Clarity</div>

 

A Yom Ha’Shoa tribute to my late grandmother (Esther Klein, 1918-2011), who did more than survive Auschwitz and Ravensbruck:  She defeated them.

 

To truly do justice to Esther Klein, I ought to invite you to my kitchen as I tell you about her. I would seat you in the corner on a rickety step stool, play some swing music, and let you peel some potatoes for my soup, or very slowly add the ground nuts into the egg whites for the highest rising Pesach cake in Bayswater, if not all of Queens.

 

While you were on that step stool, I would tell you stories about my childhood and my sisters and my parents, all gone. I would never cry. I would tell you in a way that never scared you or depressed you, but instead compelled you to bring the story forward, to your own kitchens, later.

 

I would sing along with the music and laugh at your jokes, whether or not they were funny, and I would tell you my distinct opinion on family life, world politics, fashion, economics, literature, or social etiquette.

 

Later, we would play Rummikub and I would scratch your back until you fell asleep. I would tell you stories about your father, when he was little, and how he reminded me in this way of my own father, and in that way, of you.

 

Without too much effort, I would tie you generations back, and tie myself generations forward, completely by the way, as you were dozing off.

 

You would never guess that my own wonderful childhood ended at the train tracks, until I would tell you that part, too. There was a perfect sense that nightmarish evil was absolutely real, and also that, most decisively… “Ve Von.”

We won because, when you are not sitting on that step stool, I am using it, well into my 80’s, to climb to reach things from the top cabinet, teaching you that it’s all about balance.

 

I tell you about my very religious and learned father who learned at the Shabbat table with my mother, back when most European women were learning the Tzena Re’enna. Who sent his sons to yeshiva and expected them to work, like he did. I would tell you how my mother, Nechama, prepared blueberry jam for stomach ailments, because she was known as something of a medicine woman around town, and, like my father’s dry-goods store, her kitchen was a regular stop for the local poor.

 

I would create a seamless flow from the Hershkowitz’s charitable and intellectual kitchen in Seredna to my short but horrific stay in Auschwitz and then Ravensbruck, where I was sustained by my nieces, teenagers of whom my sisters put me in charge… and then right back to the kitchen where we now sit, making potato soup.

 

Which, if I were my grandmother, would bring me back to my mother, who told me on our first day in Auschwitz, when we were being processed into our potato sacks, to ignore the SS, just as I had ignored the goats and the cows back home. My mother had reminded me, in those two weeks we were together before she disappeared in a cloud over Poland, who was the human being in this situation, and what that demanded of me. I remembered, and reminded, every day since.

 

What it meant to be human was to have both determination and balance. Empathy and a sense of justice. Respect for the dead and a total dedication to the living. To living. A sense of reverence and a sense of humor. Balance. Living modestly but mindful of aesthetics. A dedication and deep gratitude to America, and a complete devotion to and support of Israel. Work outside the home well into her 70’s, and family always first. Being equal parts emotional, intellectual, and physical. Torah classes, survivor’s meetings, family events, the gym. Shul and the beach, both healing.

 

Being realistic and optimistic – living on that delicate edge of facing down yesterday and expecting a reversal tomorrow, while completely in the present, today. My Grandma was Zen before anyone knew what that was, except maybe my uncle.

 

My grandmother’s life, you would soon see, was a “Dayenu” story. Thankful and disbelieving of every victory, and also always pushing the envelope toward the next one, the one that her father demanded that she pursue.

 

Esther Klein did things on her terms. She accepted God’s will. But to the greatest possible extent, it would be God’s… and Esther’s.

 

It was the endless winter that began 1945. My grandmother and her nieces had just been marched through the snow from Auschwitz to Ravensbruck. The Nazis felt that the end was near, and the final solution needed final solving. To accelerate matters, they put the women in an outdoor tent in sub-freezing weather. The calculations were correct. Half died the first night there. The survivors, my grandmother told me, slept very little, and when they did, it was standing or sitting, huddled in groups.

 

They also didn’t let go of their tin cups, because that way, they could drink hot soup, when it was available. Being and asthmatic since age 13, my grandmother got sick. Very sick. She did the forbidden and fell asleep. She thought she would not wake up. But then something crazy happened. She had a dream.

 

In that dream, her father, whom she had not seen since getting off the train on Shavuot of 1944, was standing near a window in a long white robe. She said it looked like a kittel. He asked her to come look out the window. He pointed actively to a tree with white blossoms, and told her: When the trees start to blossom white, you and Ibby and Helen will be free. Please wait.

 

So she woke up. She stood up. And she waited. And encouraged others to do the same. As her father promised, they were liberated in spring. The Swedish Red Cross took my grandmother and her nieces back to Sweden. When they disembarked this more benevolent train, they found that they had arrived in an orchard in full bloom. On every tree, white flowers.

 

This story, which every Klein grandchild has heard more than once, was Grandma’s way of saying that you need an inner guide, one that is firmly planted in your own authentic roots, but that you make yours, and tell it your way. You need to hang on and believe in God, but you need to do your part to make it so. She believed in Divine miracles made real only via human effort, which is the message of the first Esther, too. She believed in bearing witness to the past, and she believed in writing your own story going forward.

 

Grandma, I miss you terribly. A world without you is a strange place. But you taught us what your idyllic life before Auschwitz, and your unthinkable time there, taught you: how to balance on a rickety step stool while singing and reaching higher.

 

What more could we have asked to know?