Dana Bornstein

Dana Bornstein

Nativ
Program: 
Hometown: Stoughton, Massachusetts
High School: Stoughton High School
Program: Nativ
 
Why did you decide to take a gap year? 
I’ve been very active at my synagogue and in USY for years and there is always talk of these “gap year programs” and I’ve always wanted to go on one.  Once senior year rolled around and I really started looking into schools, I kept the gap year in my head but I honestly didn’t think I would actually go because I was always too focused on college.  I tossed back and forth with doing a program for months.  I didn’t even make my decision until this past March.  I just thought that a gap year only means a gap year so I should take the opportunity while it’s still at hand, and I’m really not going to miss out on much if I go to college in Fall 2011 as opposed to Fall 2010.
 
Why did you choose Nativ?
Nativ is a United Synagogue of Consevative Judaism program and and I’m pretty active in the movement.  I’ve already been to Israel with USY so I know how well the programs are run and I know that what I’m told I’ll be able to do I will be able to do.  Also, I will get the opportunity to study at Hebrew University for a semester and the credits will transfer completely to my college without having to reapply as a transfer student.
 
What are your goals for this year?
I want to be able to do everything I possibly can to get the most out of living in Israel.  I want to live more like a citizen not a tourist.  And of course doing well at Hebrew U is important because the credits will be a great thing to enter college with!
 
What are you most looking forward to this year?
I’m definitely looking forward to just living in Israel and being fully immersed into the everyday lives of the people living there
 
How do you plan on celebrating the Chagim (high holidays) in Israel?
From what I’ve read in the program book, the Nativ 30 group spends the Chagim together.  But as far as what we’re actually doing and where we’ll be going, I don’t yet.
 
Where will you go to school after your gap year?
I’m going to the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, but who knows, maybe I’ll end up loving Hebrew U!

Ari Brickman

Ari Brickman

Young Judaea Year Course
Name: Ari Brickman
Hometown: Skokie, IL
High School: Chicagoland Jewish High School
College: The Joint Program with Columbia University and the Jewish Theological Seminary
 
Why did you decided to take a gap year in Israel?
I took a gap year for many reasons to be honest. But, the two main reasons are:
1) I wanted a year in which I could find out who I was. I needed to give myself an opportunity to mature in a way that I knew was not possible to do while in college.
2) I had been to Israel previously but all of my trips had been short (a month at the longest). I loved being in Israel and wanted an opportunity to explore it and to immerse myself in the culture.
 
Why did you choose Young Judaea Year Course?
I chose Year Course because it offered everything I was looking for. Not only did the program offer an array of options, but also the people that chose the program were very diverse. I had the opportunity to truly customize my year. Year Course gave me the ability to really explore and not to be restricted in what I did.
 
What was the best part of the year?
The best part of the year would have to be the community volunteering. I lived in Bat Yam and volunteered at a school for kids with special needs. I fell in love with the school, the kids, and the city. In addition to that, Bat Yam was a 20-minute bus ride to Tel Aviv and we had the ability to go there whenever we wanted!
 
What was your most memorable moment in Israel?
My most memorable moment in Israel was during my last week there. We were given one day off from volunteering to explore Israel and do something that we wanted to do before we left. I went with a group of friends to see Rosh Hanikra and then afterwards we ended up visiting Achzibland. What was special is that Eli Avivi, the president of Achzibland, drove my friends and I into the city where we needed to catch our train and spent 3 hours telling us all about his life, why he started Achzibland, and other random stories. Eli, while a bit crazy, had an absolutely fascinating story to tell. He truly exemplified the typical Israeli, who is hospitable and wants to share their love of the land and their story with others.
 
What was the greatest challenge you overcame while in Israel? 
Learning to live in a foreign country without the support system that I was used to having back home was quite a challenge. While I made a great group of friends quickly and we relied on one another to get through challenging times it was still a culture shock. From learning how to go grocery shopping in a foreign country to how you are supposed to act while in public was all very different from what I was used to.
 
What were the best skills I learned while in Israel?
I learned to be independent and more than that I learned about the person that I wanted to be. Being in Israel for a year, traveling and volunteering gave me insight into the type of life I wanted to be leading and the type of person I wanted to be. I grew up in a way I didn’t think was possible, and learned how to take control of my life.
 
How do you stay connected to Israel today?
Israel is still a huge part of my life. I am on the pro-Israel group on campus and advocate for Israel on an almost daily basis. In addition I have tried to share my love of Israel with others. I am currently the Israel Educator at Camp Chi in Wisconsin. I also help Young Judaea with recruitment for Year Course because of what a huge impact it had on me.
 
What is your favorite Israeli song?
Either Mi’mamakim or At Yafa.

Gabriel Seed

Gabriel Seed

Nativ
Program: 
While the whole year has been one amazing experience, one of the most unique moments that I will hold onto was spending Yom Kippur in Jerusalem. Although the services I attended were very moving, it was nothing compared to walking down Emek Refaim and Keren Hayesod streets, packed with pedestrians and bicyclists (and no cars) as even the traffic signals were shut off.  There is nothing more special than realizing that the entire city is observing the holiday along with you.
 
I feel that I have become more independent and prepared for life on a college campus next year through my studies, work, and all of the other experiences I have had this year. Being on Nativ and in Israel has exposed me to many different people and places, sights and sounds.  I will never look at many things the same way I did before this year as a result of the important life lessons I have learned.
 

Bucket-showers and brick-shlepping

<div class="masa-blog-title">Bucket-showers and brick-shlepping</div>

 
By Elana Stern
 
I looked down at the muddy floor again and, just to be sure, I gazed back at the water tap in the ceiling. Nothing. It was my second day in Rwanda, and there was no running water. I had listened to all the other advice we had been given but I hadn’t believed that running water would actually stop.
 
I spent the month of February volunteering at the Agahozo Shalom Youth Village in Rwanda.
 

Safety and security

Safety and security

FAQ Weight: 
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The safety and security of Masa Israel Journey program participants, staff and partners is our top priority.Masa Israel Journey maintains strict standards for safety and security on all program sponsored activities.
 
As a joint project of the Government of Israel and the Jewish Agency for Israel, Masa Israel programs receive updated information regarding safety and security regularly and are able to respond to official recommendations.

Videos

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Aardvark Israel

 

Bina: Social Action and Study in Tel Aviv

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Program Description

BINA offers high school graduates a unique opportunity to experience real life with Israeli young adults in Tel Aviv, Israel's most exciting city. Program participants will engage in meaningful social action in the community in which they live, and explore the Jewish bookshelf from a pluralistic and progressive perspective. For the past decade, BINA: Center for Jewish Identity and Hebrew Culture has offered hundreds of young adults from Israel and around the world opportunities to experience significant learning, encounter a wide range of thinking and thinkers, and devote themselves to social change.
 
You will engage in meaningful volunteer assignments in your community in south Tel Aviv. Highly experienced counselors and mentors at BINA, with their personal commitment to social justice, will provide close supervision and guidance in each of your volunteer assignments. You will study classical Jewish texts, Jewish philosophy, social justice and Israeli studies, taught by Israel's leading scholars and educators. You will study, volunteer and live side-by-side with Israeli peers, celebrating Shabbat services and holidays together.
 

Habonim Dror - Shnat Amlat

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Program Description

 

Hamaor Hagadol

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Program Description

Central Yeshiva Tomchei Tmimim, located in the rural and pastoral village of Kfar Chabad—far from the hubbub and commotion of big city life (yet located in the center of Israel)—is the perfect place to spend a year of study and growth in Israel.
 

Pninim Seminary

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Program Description

P'ninim Seminary offers stimulating classes with a focus on hashkafa and machshava. They delve into familiar elements in Yiddishkeit and learn them in a way that is barely touched upon in high school by combining traditional textual learning such as Chumash, Navi, Medrash and weekly parsha with thought-provoking haskafa and practical application. 
 
P'ninim provides the intellectual seminary challenge while inspiring students to appreciate anew that which they have always learned from their parents and teachers.