Polina Yurkovetsky

Polina Yurkovetsky

Russian Speaking Desk Representative

eJewish Philanthropy: We Don’t Need a ‘Jewish Peace Corps’, We Already Have One

eJewish Philanthropy: We Don’t Need a ‘Jewish Peace Corps’, We Already Have One

March 3, 2016

By Tamar Zilbershatz, Director of Gap and Service Programs

We don’t need a ‘Jewish Peace Corps’, we already have one in Israel and around the world.

Instead of creating yet another organization or institution to compete for Jewish millennials’ attention, the Jewish world must leverage and promote the plethora of existing Peace Corps-like opportunities that are offered and subsidized around the world and particularly in Israel. It is extremely important to myself and my colleagues that you and your readers know about all of the service-learning opportunities available to them in Israel. And not just that, but that thousands of Jewish millennials are engaging with Israel not out of anger, but out of a genuine desire for personal growth and professional development.

 

Service to Israel is integral to helping participants of long-term Israel programs to truly experience Israel for all of its beauty and complexity. In exposing them to the challenges and issues facing Israeli society, service and volunteer projects foster participants’ personal connections to the land, the State and its people. They see Israel for themselves, ask difficult questions, form educated and nuanced opinions and learn to navigate uncertainty.

 

Every immersive Israel experience includes social action and community service components, as well as Jewish studies. Whether studying abroad in Be’er Sheva, learning at a yeshiva in Jerusalem or interning at a start-up in Tel Aviv, each participant of a 2-10 month Israel program has a meaningful and eye-opening service experience that informs his or Jewish identity and relationship with Israel.

 

More specifically, gap year and post-college service-learning programs encompass a significant segment of the vast programmatic offerings available in Israel. As I write this piece – and right now, as you read it – more than 1,500 Jewish millennials are living and learning the values of tikkun olam in Israel. They are working directly with disadvantaged Jews and impoverished Israeli Arabs, as well as African refugees and asylum seekers – in both central Israel and the periphery.

 

Youth movement and non-denominational gap year students are Diaspora Jews from around the world who come to Israel for a year of service and self-discovery after graduating high school. They live, volunteer and study in a few different cities throughout their year in Israel, including underprivileged communities like Bat Yam, Yerucham, Kfar Chasidim, and others.

 

College-educated individuals work in underserved elementary and middle schools across Israel, helping Israeli teachers to improve students’ English learning outcomes. They serve Bedouin communities in Rahat and Be’er Sheva and Israeli Arabs in Lod, as well as Ethiopian, former Soviet Union, and other immigrant communities throughout Israel.

 

Other service-learning programs like Solidarity of Nations – Achvat Amim, the Yahel Social Change program, Tikkun Olam in Tel Aviv-Jaffa and Israel Corps – Project TEN are specifically built around the issues of human rights, social justice and environmental activism. Diaspora Jewish participants of these programs work with local nonprofit organizations in various cities and communities. They also engage in renewed dialogue surrounding Zionism in the 21st century with their Israeli peers.

 

For Jews at risk around the world, heavily subsidized Israel programs provide those interested in making Aliyah with a soft-landing. From developing a foundational knowledge of the Hebrew language, to networking and relationship-building, to getting a foot in the door in one’s industry of choice or field of study, long-term Israel experiences serve as a pre-Aliyah immersion for thousands of Jews from places like Ukraine. For those who do not make Aliyah, they return home with extensive leadership skills and experiences and a built-in global network of global Jewish leaders.

 

Post-program research shows that alumni of immersive Israel programs of all ages, who come from across the Jewish spectrum, emerge more connected to their people and more invested in their Jewish identity. They are three times more attached to Israel and twice as engaged and informed about Israel than their peers. Empowered by a transformative, independent experience, alumni volunteer with Israel advocacy groups almost three times more than people who do not participate in similar programs and are 100% more likely to take a leadership role inside or outside the Jewish community.

 

Although long-term Israel programs are not the same scale as the Peace Corps, or maybe Yossi Beilin’s vision, a wide array of existing programs offer Jewish young adults numerous to take part in inter-racial, inter-religious and international humanitarian work in Israel.

 

So before we jump to write off the existing landscape of Israel engagement, perhaps we should take a closer look at the impact currently taking shape.

 

Tamar Zilbershatz serves as Masa Israel Journey’s Director of Gap and Service Programs. You can learn more about Masa Israel Journey’s volunteer programs by visiting MasaIsrael.org, IsraelTeachingFellows.org and PostCollege.MasaIsrael.org.

 

Originally published on eJewish Philanthropy

Masa-GLI Global Leadership Summit Spring 2016

Masa-GLI Global Leadership Summit Spring 2016

March 27, 2016 (All day)  -  March 31, 2016 (All day)

  Jerusalem  - 

Who is a Leader? What are my challenges as a Leader? How can I grow personally? How can we collectively create change?

The Masa-GLI Global Leadership Development Initiative team is delighted to invite you to apply to join the March 2016 Global Leadership Summit.
 

Develop leadership skills with trainers and peers committed to your advancement as a leader. Access and join a network of resourceful individuals and organizations that will support your personal and professional growth and provide avenues for making an impact in the Jewish world after the end of your Masa program. Deepen and broaden your knowledge of issues facing the Jewish world. Apply your learning to real situations that can impact your community. Share your expertise with a diverse group from across the globe.

How do you apply?

Apply now to join the March 2016 Global Leadership Summit:
English: http://masaglimarch2016.eventbrite.com/

French: http://masaglimarch2016fr.eventbrite.com/

Russian: http://masaglimarch2016ru.eventbrite.com/

Applications close 28 February 2016.

How can you find out more?
Ben Baginsky, Program Director (benb@jafi.org / 02 621 6468)

The Other Side of Purim: #MasaGives

<div class="masa-blog-title">The Other Side of Purim: #MasaGives</div>

By Yehudit Werchow, Director of Education

 

 Jan Lievens' "The Feast of Esther" (Via Wiki Media Commons)

 

"וַיֹּאמֶר מָרְדֳּכַי לְהָשִׁיב אֶל אֶסְתֵּר אַל תְּדַמִּי בְנַפְשֵׁךְ לְהִמָּלֵט בֵּית הַמֶּלֶךְ מִכָּל הַיְּהוּדִים. כִּי אִם הַחֲרֵשׁ תַּחֲרִישִׁי בָּעֵת הַזֹּאת רֶוַח וְהַצָּלָה יַעֲמוֹד לַיְּהוּדִים מִמָּקוֹם אַחֵר וְאַתְּ וּבֵית אָבִיךְ תֹּאבֵדוּ וּמִי יוֹדֵעַ אִם לְעֵת כָּזֹא הִגַּעַתְּ לַמַּלְכוּת." (מגלית אסתר פרק ד)


“And Mordechai told the palace messenger: Tell Esther – don’t think about your own wellbeing at a time when the lives of all Jews are in the balance. Because if you are silent now, salvation will surely come to the Jews from another source anyway, and your legacy, and your father’s, will be lost to history. Who knows if this is the entire reason you were made Queen?” (the Scroll of Esther, Chapter 4)
 

In this excerpt from the Book of Esther, Mordechai, Jewish leader and a relative of the newly-chosen young queen, asks Esther to do something bold: Advocate for her hated People, even as she has kept her nationality to herself until this point.

 

Edwin Longsden Long's "Esther Haram" (Via Wiki Media Commons)

 

How many times have we found ourselves struggling, avoiding, or resisting action? At times it could be because we are not sure if we understand the motivation behind the action or its purpose, sometimes it’s because we feel that the call for action is external or that the timing is not ideal.


There are times when our resistance emerges from our fears of change, disapproval, insecurities (are we talented enough, strong enough, safe, resourceful) or from our fear of being successful, from letting our talent be present and seen.


Esther, just like many of us, is, before approaching the King on behalf of her People, which she had kept secret, facing her own moment of inner struggle and transformation. In her case, the call for action is coming from Mordechai. It seems that at first, she struggles with it. Perhaps it’s because of the scope of the act, the circumstances, which are understandably intimidating and obviously threatening.

 

Aert de Gelder's "Esther and Mordechai writing the second letter of Purim" (Via Wiki Media Commons)

 

Yet, she embraces the call and acts on it with courage and beauty, giving of herself, using her emotional intelligence for the greater good.


Calls for action don’t necessarily need to come from within, and this doesn’t mean that these are any less legitimate. It feels like Esther connected with her inner truth and motivations to act and these powerful sources empowered and liberated her from the paralyzing fears driving her to act so courageously and resourcefully, to come to a place of giving.


Purim and the Megilla are invitations to reunite our personal and collective deepest values, motivations and strengths. Invitations to give back to our family and friends, to Israel, our own communities and the Jewish people. Let’s embrace these invitations and grow with them. 


This Purim, join the Masa Israel community and show the world where you’re living and giving:

 


Download the sign here, write your city on the map and share your picture using #MasaGives.

 

 

Axel Angeles

Axel Angeles

Marketing and Communications Coordinator

Roxy Donay

Roxy Donay

Program Director

Israel Experiences & Post Programs

The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles

 RDonay@JewishLA.org

Jacob Allen

Jacob Allen

Israel & Overseas Associate

Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit 

allen@jfmd.org

Meara Razon Ashtivker

Alex Elman

Alex Elman

Director, Marketing and Communications

Masa Israel Journey Names New North American COO

Masa Israel Journey Names New North American COO

Masa Israel Journey Names New North American COO

February 22, 2016

Welcome to the Masa Israel family, Meara Razon Ashtivker

Meara joins us from the hi-tech sector, where she  served as C.O.O. at Boomset, an innovative event-tech company, managing sales and marketing and spearheading global partnerships. Prior to joining Boomset, Meara held the position of V.P. of community outreach for Jspace.com where she created and executed a marketing plan, as well as planned and produced mass-attended events.

 

True to our mission, Meara has lived it like a local,  having spent significant time living, working and studying in Israel. After receiving her B.A. from the University of Hartford, she was selected to participate in the Otzma program. In the years following, she moved to Miami to work with Young Judaea and returned to Israel to work for the Jewish Agency for Israel. Meara received an M.A. in non-profit management from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem while working for Beit Hatfutsot.

 

Meara served as the board chair for Dor Chadash and sat on the board of directors of the American Zionist Movement and the Moatza in New York.

 

In her new position as Masa Israel’s North American COO, where she will be managing the national recruitment and marketing efforts in the US.

She plans on expanding her vast global and local partner network, industry insight and international know-how to continue to bring an increasing number of young Jews to Israel in order to impact the futures of both.

 

We wish her, and us, much success! Welcome to the Masa Israel family, Meara.