Gap Year | Masa Israel

Gap Year

Out of Chaos, Total Clarity">Out of Chaos, Total Clarity

Posted May 4th, 2016

A Yom Ha’Shoa tribute to my late grandmother (Esther Klein, 1918-2011), who did more than survive Auschwitz and Ravensbruck:  She defeated them.

 

To truly do justice to Esther Klein, I ought to invite you to my kitchen as I tell you about her. I would seat you in the corner on a rickety step stool, play some swing music, and let you peel some potatoes for my soup, or very slowly add the ground nuts into the egg whites for the highest rising Pesach cake in Bayswater, if not all of Queens.

 

While you were on that step stool, I would tell you stories about my childhood and my sisters and my parents, all gone. I would never cry. I would tell you in a way that never scared you or depressed you, but instead compelled you to bring the story forward, to your own kitchens, later.

 

I would sing along with the music and laugh at your jokes, whether or not they were funny, and I would tell you my distinct opinion on family life, world politics, fashion, economics, literature, or social etiquette.

 

Later, we would play Rummikub and I would scratch your back until you fell asleep. I would tell you stories about your father, when he was little, and how he reminded me in this way of my own father, and in that way, of you.

 

Without too much effort, I would tie you generations back, and tie myself generations forward, completely by the way, as you were dozing off.

 

You would never guess that my own wonderful childhood ended at the train tracks, until I would tell you that part, too. There was a perfect sense that nightmarish evil was absolutely real, and also that, most decisively… “Ve Von.”

We won because, when you are not sitting on that step stool, I am using it, well into my 80’s, to climb to reach things from the top cabinet, teaching you that it’s all about balance.

 

I tell you about my very religious and learned father who learned at the Shabbat table with my mother, back when most European women were learning the Tzena Re’enna. Who sent his sons to yeshiva and expected them to work, like he did. I would tell you how my mother, Nechama, prepared blueberry jam for stomach ailments, because she was known as something of a medicine woman around town, and, like my father’s dry-goods store, her kitchen was a regular stop for the local poor.

 

I would create a seamless flow from the Hershkowitz’s charitable and intellectual kitchen in Seredna to my short but horrific stay in Auschwitz and then Ravensbruck, where I was sustained by my nieces, teenagers of whom my sisters put me in charge… and then right back to the kitchen where we now sit, making potato soup.

 

Which, if I were my grandmother, would bring me back to my mother, who told me on our first day in Auschwitz, when we were being processed into our potato sacks, to ignore the SS, just as I had ignored the goats and the cows back home. My mother had reminded me, in those two weeks we were together before she disappeared in a cloud over Poland, who was the human being in this situation, and what that demanded of me. I remembered, and reminded, every day since.

 

What it meant to be human was to have both determination and balance. Empathy and a sense of justice. Respect for the dead and a total dedication to the living. To living. A sense of reverence and a sense of humor. Balance. Living modestly but mindful of aesthetics. A dedication and deep gratitude to America, and a complete devotion to and support of Israel. Work outside the home well into her 70’s, and family always first. Being equal parts emotional, intellectual, and physical. Torah classes, survivor’s meetings, family events, the gym. Shul and the beach, both healing.

 

Being realistic and optimistic – living on that delicate edge of facing down yesterday and expecting a reversal tomorrow, while completely in the present, today. My Grandma was Zen before anyone knew what that was, except maybe my uncle.

 

My grandmother’s life, you would soon see, was a “Dayenu” story. Thankful and disbelieving of every victory, and also always pushing the envelope toward the next one, the one that her father demanded that she pursue.

 

Esther Klein did things on her terms. She accepted God’s will. But to the greatest possible extent, it would be God’s… and Esther’s.

 

It was the endless winter that began 1945. My grandmother and her nieces had just been marched through the snow from Auschwitz to Ravensbruck. The Nazis felt that the end was near, and the final solution needed final solving. To accelerate matters, they put the women in an outdoor tent in sub-freezing weather. The calculations were correct. Half died the first night there. The survivors, my grandmother told me, slept very little, and when they did, it was standing or sitting, huddled in groups.

 

They also didn’t let go of their tin cups, because that way, they could drink hot soup, when it was available. Being and asthmatic since age 13, my grandmother got sick. Very sick. She did the forbidden and fell asleep. She thought she would not wake up. But then something crazy happened. She had a dream.

 

In that dream, her father, whom she had not seen since getting off the train on Shavuot of 1944, was standing near a window in a long white robe. She said it looked like a kittel. He asked her to come look out the window. He pointed actively to a tree with white blossoms, and told her: When the trees start to blossom white, you and Ibby and Helen will be free. Please wait.

 

So she woke up. She stood up. And she waited. And encouraged others to do the same. As her father promised, they were liberated in spring. The Swedish Red Cross took my grandmother and her nieces back to Sweden. When they disembarked this more benevolent train, they found that they had arrived in an orchard in full bloom. On every tree, white flowers.

 

This story, which every Klein grandchild has heard more than once, was Grandma’s way of saying that you need an inner guide, one that is firmly planted in your own authentic roots, but that you make yours, and tell it your way. You need to hang on and believe in God, but you need to do your part to make it so. She believed in Divine miracles made real only via human effort, which is the message of the first Esther, too. She believed in bearing witness to the past, and she believed in writing your own story going forward.

 

Grandma, I miss you terribly. A world without you is a strange place. But you taught us what your idyllic life before Auschwitz, and your unthinkable time there, taught you: how to balance on a rickety step stool while singing and reaching higher.

 

What more could we have asked to know?
 

 

The Jerusalem Post: For those looking to explore Israel, emerging cities">The Jerusalem Post: For those looking to explore Israel, emerging cities

Publish Date: 
April 26, 2016

By Shaina Oppenheimer

 

Integral to the choice of coming to Israel is the eagerness to give back to its people. Masa hopes to inculcate a sense of shared responsibility.

Every year, Masa Israel Journey enables thousands of young Jewish adults to come to Israel on various programs and experience the country as a local, diving deep into Israeli culture. However, the dynamic of these programs is starting to change; as more participants gravitate towards smaller cities, the focus is shifting from “my Israel” to “our Israel.”

 

A service and learning program incorporating gap years, study abroad, volunteer work and other post-graduate work contexts, Masa is starting to radiate waves of change throughout the Jewish community in moderately-sized metropolises, such as Beit She’an, Petah Tikva and Beersheba.

 

Read the full story on JPost.com. 

The Jerusalem Post: Hey America, 'ma Nishtana?'">The Jerusalem Post: Hey America, 'ma Nishtana?'

Publish Date: 
April 24, 2016

By Liran Avisar, CEO of Masa Israel Journey

 

Today, there are more options available than ever before for young people to experience Israel, whether for days, weeks, months, or an entire year.

Every spring, Jewish people across the United States and around the world sit at a table with their friends and family to retell the story of our exodus from Egypt. The first leg of our journey back in time begins with the “Ma Nishtana” (“What has changed?”), also known as the Four Questions.

 

As we prepare to retell the story of the liberation of the Israelites and the birth of the Jewish people, it is also worth exploring the current state of our Tribe. This Passover, I have four slightly different questions for the American Jewish community.

 

These are the four major questions that are worth asking:

 

1. How can we increase young American Jews’ interest in Jewish life and Israel? 

 

If you just read the headlines, it might seem that engagement is on the decline and anti-Israel activities are expanding. But the sky isn’t exactly falling.

 

One thing we do know is that it takes a transformative Israel experience with a lasting impact for Jewish young adults to reestablish, or even establish for the first time, their personal connections to the Jewish people and to Israel – to discover the Tribe.

 

Now, I am not talking about a single event, happening, or “aha” moment. Though for some it may only take one spark to reignite the Jewish fire inside. I’m not talking about the classic structure of organized Israel trips that include a bus tour of the country’s sites like Masada and Yad Vashem, meeting Israelis, learning to count to 10 in Hebrew and stuffing your face with more hummus and falafel than you ever thought possible.

 

These are clearly cornerstones to a young Diaspora Jew’s introduction to Israel – the state, the land and the people. However, the personal moments, conversations and observations enabled by a long-term Israel experience are the lasting connections that help our young people realize they are part of something bigger than themselves – Am Yisrael.

 

I’m talking about your first trip to an Israeli mall, when you see the clothing and accessories covered in Stars of David instead of crosses. The grandmotherly women you encounter on the bus that offers unsolicited life advice and a bite of their snacks as if you were their own grandchild.

 

The way in which everyone wishes you “Shana Tova” in the fall, not because they’re religious or on the way to synagogue, but because it’s as natural as wishing someone “Happy Holidays” in the winter in America.

 

These are the local Israeli moments that stay with young Jews as they go back home and reflect on their experience and newfound connection to Israel and their Jewish identities. They are what make that connection durable.

 

2. How do we empower our students to authentically change the Israel conversation on college campuses across the country?

 

Young Jews who spend substantial amounts of time living in Israel are much more equipped to deal with the often hostile anti-Israel rhetoric and activities on campus. Having spent significant time in Israel, they know more about what’s happening (and has happened) on the ground. As such, they are not only able to take part in discussions and debates, but also have the knowledge and tools to change the tone and content of the conversations.

 

By bringing their own Israel stories and experience into campus dialogue, these students have the power to change a combative debate into a personal conversation. Having a trove of deeply personal experiences on the ground in Israel allows individuals to speak more knowledgeably and comfortably about Israel and its politics.

 

Spending significant time in Israel also enables young Jews to better differentiate between legitimate criticism and uninformed, misguided hatred. Rather than feeding into the entrenched, polarizing propaganda war, these students are empowered to respectfully confront dissenting viewpoints. They can go beyond traditional hasbara (public diplomacy) efforts and pro-Israel talking points to have nuanced and intellectual conversations about the reality of the challenges facing the State of Israel, its leadership and its people.

 

3. What will the US Jewish community’s professional and lay leadership look like in 10 years?

 

With the number of unaffiliated Jews in America on the rise, one might think that the American Jewish community’s professional and lay leadership is shrinking or narrowing. However, the pipeline is actually expanding. One key indicator of young Jews who remain engaged and take on leadership roles in Jewish life are those who have spent an extended amount of time in Israel.

 

The variety of opportunities to spend meaningful time in Israel has consistently grown over the past several years. Today, there are more options available than ever before for young people to experience Israel, whether for days, weeks, months, or an entire year.

 

In 10 years, the majority of Jewish adults in the United States will have participated in an immersive Israel experience. We are talking about an unprecedented reality for the American Jewish community.

 

Throughout my and my American colleague’s meetings with our numerous Jewish communal partners, from Jewish Federations to Hillels to synagogues and beyond, it becomes more and more apparent that alumni of immersive Israel experiences, particularly those who have spent between five to 12 months in Israel, are overrepresented in the Jewish professional world. They are everywhere, in every organization, and they are the future leaders of the Jewish community.

 

As a result, they are and will continue to be more determined to connect Israel to all aspects of Jewish life. More than anything, they will make Israel travel an integral part of Jewish life and Jewish experiences. That, my friends, is revolutionary.

 

In a decade, these same young leaders will hold influential positions, whether in the Jewish world, business world, the philanthropic world and beyond. They will be the ones calling the shots and making important decisions. To have their Israel stories to tell and an unforgettable experience to look back on will mold these discussions and decisions before they even begin.

 

4. Yalla, nu, when are you coming?

 

Originally published in The Jerusalem Post.

Image: 

9 MUST-READS BEFORE STUDYING ABROAD IN ISRAEL">9 MUST-READS BEFORE STUDYING ABROAD IN ISRAEL

Posted April 20th, 2016

 

By Andria Kaplan Aylyarov

 

 

 

1. The Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew and the Heart of the Middle East, Sandy Tolan

Sandy Tolan dives deep inside the relationship of Bashir Khairi, a Palestinian and Dalia Eshkenazi Landau, an Israeli college student. The book breaks down the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through the relationship of this unlikely friendship and proves hope and transformation does exist.

 

2. ‘Catch the Jew,’ Tuvia Tenenbom

Written by Tuvia Tenenbom, a Jewish journalist, who disguises himself as a German reporter so he can wander Israel for seven months. Tenebom visits Gaza, the West Bank and numerous Israeli cities to break bread and mingle with people of all kinds to unfold the unknown truths of the Holy Land.

 

3. My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel, Ari Shavit

Ari Shavit is one of the most influential journalists in the Middle East and in this book, a personal narrative we are introduced to Shavit’s great-grandfather, a British Zionist who comes to Israel on a Thomas Cook tour in 1897. The book will help grasp your personal understanding of “why did Israel come to be, how did it come to be, and can Israel survive.

 

4. Startup Nation, Dan Senor and Saul Singer

Have you ever wondered how a country so young, surrounded by enemies on all sides is able to produce more startup companies than any other country? Authors Dan Senor and Saul Singer examine the adversity-drive culture and workplace informalities that shape the great country that is now called, Startup Nation.

 

5. Commander of the Exodus, Yoram Kaniuk

The books describe the story of a man, Yossi Harel, known to some as a modern-day Moses, who commands a ship carrying 24,000 Holocaust survivors to the shores of Palestine despite what the British Mandate says.

 

6. In the Land of Israel, Amos Oz

The famous Israeli novelist Amoz Oz interviews dozens of his fellow countrymen from every corner of Israel, every cultural background to paint a diverse portrait of their fears, hopes and prejudices.

 

7. Our Man in Damascus- Elie Cohen, Aaron Eitan Meyer

Calling all espionage enthusiasts! This book is the amazing story of of Elie Cohen, who managed to infiltrate the hierarchy of an enemy nation to a degree completely unheard of.

 

8. Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain

If you’re coming to Israel and looking to travel to countries close by for the low then this book is a must-read. Twain’s book describes his journey on a charted vessel with numerous stops in Marseilles, Israel, Rome, Odessa and Morocco.

 

9. The Seven Good Years, Etgar Keret

Etgar Keret, one of Israel’s most well-known authors, wrote The Seven Good Years, his first memoir to document his life between the birth of his son and his father’s death. The New York Times says it’s a brilliant, life-affirming, and hilarious memoir from a genius.

 

 

 

 

 

Andria Kaplan Aylyarov is a Masa Israel Alumna and content marketing specialist for Masa Israel Journey. She loves a good glass of white wine and wishes she was 85-years-old and living in Boca, but she currently resides in Brooklyn.

 

Masa Israel Alumni Fellow of the Week: Molly Radler">Masa Israel Alumni Fellow of the Week: Molly Radler

Posted April 13th, 2016

alt="molly radler"After graduating, Molly did a Masa Israel Volunteer Program, for 10 months in the city of Akko, as well as various Druze villages in the North. There she taught English and other subjects in both formal and non-formal settings to young Jewish, Arab, and Druze teenagers. The connection Molly built with the students from different backgrounds was what lead her to want to further facilitate connections for students in the United States. Soon after she joined The David Project and became a Senior Campus Coordinator with, working with college campuses throughout the state of Florida. She helped guide pro-Israel college students to advocate for Israel on campus to the non-Jewish community, speaking on behalf of their own narratives and connecting those to their peers, making the Israel discourse on campus more inclusive and relatable.

 

Molly will be going to graduate school to pursue a Master's in Social Work with the Greater Rochester Collaborative Master of Social Work (GRC MSW) Program of Nazareth College and The College at Brockport, SUNY. 

 

 

What was the most meaningful aspect of your Masa Israel experience?


The most meaningful aspect of my Masa Israel experience was the network of people and connections I was able to take with me after my year with Masa. The bond that we formed while doing the truly amazing and unique work of our program is something that has bonded me to the group of my peers that I will carry with me for the rest of my life. In addition, Masa provided opportunities to connect with other Masa participants throughout the whole country of Israel, and some of my closest friends and some of the most inspiring people I have met are ones I met on Masa.

 

What inspired you to become a Masa Israel Alumni Fellow?


I have become a very passionate advocate for Masa and have actively been suggesting that my students and friends apply for Masa programs. I was very active in all the opportunities that Masa provided in addition to my actual program, and love to share my experience with others to hopefully get them involved as well. I hope to help connect the network of Masa alumni across the country in years to come after their volunteership, as well as advocate for many other Jewish people to be able to have a similar experience.

 

Each Masa Israel Alumni Fellow is required to create an Impact project to bring back to their local community, either to increase local alumni involvement or help recruit new participants for Masa Israel programs. What ideas do you have for your Impact project, should you be chosen as a Fellow?

 

I would love to create a network between the various Israel and Jewish organizations for young adults to learn about ways to get back to Israel through Masa. In Boston, there are already things in place for this to be successful, but on a very broad scale. If chosen I would love the opportunity to use this as a resource to start a specific project for students to find their perfect program to get back to Israel and explore their Jewish identity and connection to Israel through Masa.

 

To learn more about Masa Israel Volunteer Programs, Click Here. 
 

 

The Lasting Impact of My Gap Year in Israe">The Lasting Impact of My Gap Year in Israe

Posted April 12th, 2016

By Roxanna Donay, Nativ College Leadership Program alumna

 

Me (right) and a friend from Nativ

(Credit: Roxanna Donay)

 

“I’m not going home; I’m leaving home.”

 

With tears streaming down my face, these were the words I uttered as my El AL flight took off from Ben Gurion airport after my incredible gap year experience in Israel.

 

I had just spent nine months in my newfound home away from home, and as I headed to college, my life was changed forever. On the Nativ College Leadership Program in Israel, a program of Masa Israel Journey, I spent one semester studying and earning academic credits at the Rothberg International School at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and one semester teaching English and volunteering in Yerucham (a small town in the south of Israel). I was able to further my education and gain real life experience — a combination that many other 18-year-olds enter college without.

 

Roxanna Donay and Nativ Friends

Me (center) and my Nativ friends in Jerusalem

(Credit: Rosanna Donay)

 

Like any typical college student, I was waking myself up, eating breakfast, getting to class on time (usually), writing papers, and studying for finals — only I was doing it all in Israel. I was living independently from my parents in a foreign country where I was given the space and the structure to succeed. What my 18-year-old self didn’t know was that I would soon be paying it forward. Upon graduating from college, I started a new adventure and began working at The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles with Masa Israel Journey (a project of The Jewish Agency for Israel and the Government of Israel) helping hundreds of others embark on their own journeys in Israel.

 

Spending a long period of time in Israel means that people truly become a part of the Israeli communities in which they live, and as a result, understand what’s at stake when it comes to the continuity of the Jewish people. Masa Israel provides and connects young adults (ages 18-30) from around the world with leading immersive international experiences in Israel designed to enrich their personal and professional growth. Such experiences facilitate the next generation of young Jewish leaders — whether it’s a gap year program like mine, studying abroad, volunteering, teaching English, interning, or earning a graduate degree, these experiences have profound impacts on the participants/young adults.

 

But what I didn't realize until I returned to Los Angeles was that the journey doesn’t stop in Israel. The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles has built an incredible young adult network where Masa Israel alumni can engage with our local community upon return. Through Young Adults Los Angeles (YALA), the Community Leadership Institute (CLI), Federation volunteer days and more, we each find our niche through social events, professional networking opportunities, leadership seminars, and social action.

 

Nativ Negev Tiyul

Credit: Roxanna Donay

 

The preexisting infrastructure within the Federation system led to a natural partnership between Federation and Masa in order to reach LA’s Jewish community and to recruit potential participants as well as engage alumni. Together, alumni here in LA are continuing to foster the connections to each other, Israel and the larger Jewish community that were planted while in Israel, and utilizing them to strengthen our Jewish community. I have the opportunity to work within the Federation infrastructure to grow Masa’s presence in Los Angeles as a part of a larger effort to reach and connect with young Jews seeking transformative experiences that will forever impact their lives and help them determine their own sense of Jewish identity. I know my own life has been forever transformed, and I am excited to help introduce this impactful experience to others in Los Angeles.

 

Over the last eight years, I have truly come to appreciate the powerful effect of my gap year in Israel on my life, professionally and personally. Not only did I gain an incredible sense of independence and world knowledge at a young age, but I was also able to turn my experience into a career. My work at The Jewish Federation allows me to help so many others discover life-changing opportunities that Israel has to offer.

 

Roxanna Donay

 

A native of Los Angeles, Roxanna Donay is the Program Director of Israel Experiences and Post Programming at The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles. A graduate of Cleveland High School and University of California, Davis, Roxanna spent the 2007-2008 school year on the Nativ College Leadership program, a gap year program of Masa Israel Journey.

 

 

Not your average Gap Year">Not your average Gap Year

Posted April 4th, 2016

By Amy Albertson

 

It is very common for young Jews to take a Gap Year in Israel after they graduate high school and before they begin college. These Gap Year Programs can range from a year at Yeshiva or Seminary to pre-university programs at top Israeli Universities, and each comes with the exciting experience of living in Israel and forming life-long friendships with other people your age. What could be better?


For Ethan Weiss, a 19-year-old New Jersey native, a Gap Year in Israel before college sounded like and amazing idea. However, Ethan decided that Yeshiva or other traditional Gap Year programs were not exactly what he was looking for. Instead he found Destination Israel’s Tel Aviv Internship Experience—a 5 month professional development program in Tel Aviv.


Ethan decided to do a double session--staying in Israel for 10 months instead of 5--and is interning at the Tel Aviv startup Any.Do.

 

Briefly, can you tell us about Any.Do?


Any.Do is a task management application for your mobile devices or on your computer. It allows you to create to-do lists and manage personal or business tasks. We’ve received Apple's Intuitive Touch Award and Android's Best App of 2012 and have millions of users.


And what exactly are you doing as an Intern here?


Well, I kind of do a little of everything, but in general I have been helping out with Q&A, some social media and online marketing , and a lot with Customer Success. That’s customer support from both the defensive and offensive. An alumni of the program, Sarah Stewart, is also working here so together we’ve been developing the internship for future participants.


It sounds like you’re doing a lot. How is it being at a startup?


I am doing a lot, but I am learning as much as I am doing. That is one of the best things about the startup environment. If you are motivated and creative, anyone can do anything. You just have to ask. I interact directly with the CEO or the CFO, and anyone else in the company I want to. I saw something that I thought the product team should implement and they ended up adding it to the road map. It’s really awesome to know that I’m doing real and important tasks and that I have a lot of opportunity to learn and develop.


You’re only 19 and most people your age are in traditional Gap Year programs. What made you decide to do this instead?


I know I will eventually go to college and get a degree but I wanted to get some real life, professional experience first. With all I’m learning and the experience I’m gaining I will have a better idea of what I want to study. I didn’t want to end up being one of those college students who changes their major 5 times and ends up in college for 7 years.


And what made you choose to do this on a Masa Program?


I wanted to come to Israel and this was a great opportunity to do it. I am at a great internship and I’m living in Tel Aviv. My program has great enrichments that we do each week. They’ve really opened my eyes to a lot of new things in Israel. It is a lot of fun.


Do you ever have trouble being younger than most of the other participants in your program?


Honestly, no. I can see how some people might, but I enjoy learning a lot from them. They have professional experience and have mostly already finished college so they have a lot of insight to offer me.


Back to Israel: How is it living here?


I really love living in Israel. There is a very hospitable, social culture. I enjoy how it is so easy to meet people and make friends here. You can just talk to anyone on the street!


As you can see, Ethan may not be having the average Gap Year, but he is definitely having a valuable experience. From professional growth in the startup environment to personal growth from the other participants in his program, Ethan is having the Journey of a lifetime.


To learn more about the Tel Aviv Internship program please click here.

 

 

Prepa Progress Tel Aviv

http://www.masaisrael.org/sites/default/files/Progress%20TLV%202.jpg

Program Description

Prépa Progress Tel Aviv


Le programme Prépa Progress Tel Aviv est une Mehina destinée aux Bacheliers Français souhaitant être accompagnés dans leur projet d’intégration en Israël grâce à un coaching d’orientation et une préparation académique intensive aux études supérieures en Israel.
Le programme permet à chaque étudiant de définir son projet et à partir de ce choix (filières et établissements) de bénéficier d’une préparation intensive.


Ainsi pour atteindre les objectifs fixés, l’étudiant travaille sur 4 clefs qui ouvrent les portes de tous les établissements supérieurs en Israël :

- Oulpan Intégré Intensif,
- Préparation intensive aux tests psychométriques,
- Cours d’Anglais Universitaire
- si nécessaire, l’optimisation des notes du Bac (une exclusivité Progress TLV).


La Prépa Progress TLV permet de passer sa 1ere année en Israël au cœur de Tel Aviv pour comprendre la société et la culture israélienne dans la ville Blanche, comme résident à part entière.


En savoir plus sur Prépa Progress Tel Aviv

Michèle Messika
Tél. 01 44 54 16 00 (France)
Email : contact@progress-tlv.com

Ou

Laura Cohen
Fonction : Conseillère de l'Expérience Israélienne
Téléphone (s) : France : 01 84 88 56 60 / Israël +972 73 21 90 413
Mail : ieinfopost@israelexperience.org
Site web : http://www.programmeisrael.org/massa-prepa-progress-tel-aviv/
 

  • Main Subject: Gap Year (Programs)
  •  
  • Keywords:
  • Intensive Hebrew Language 
  • Duration:
  • 8.5 Months 
  • Age:
  • 17-25 
  • Language:
  • French 
  • Organizer:
  • The Israel Experience- Educational Tourism Services Co. LTD 
  • Program appears on grant application as:
  • Prepa Progress Tel Aviv 
  • Price:
  • $ 10950 
  • Accommodation:
  • Not Included 
  • Meals:
  • Not Included 
  • Program Dates:
  • October 24,2017 - July 09,2018  Apply to this program

Masa Israel alumnae giving back to the world. #InternationalWomensDay">Masa Israel alumnae giving back to the world. #InternationalWomensDay

Posted March 8th, 2016

In honor of International Women’s Day, we decided to highlight our fellow Masa Israel alumnae and their amazing accomplishments. Here at Masa we know our participants have the potential to not only make a difference in their own lives, but in the lives of others. Giving back is the focus this month and it’s the perfect time to mention a few alumnae who have done just that.

 

1. Kayci Merritté, Yahel Social Change Program 2014-2015 Alumna

 

 

“After my Masa Israel experience, I returned to my hometown of St. Louis to serve as an AmeriCorps member assisting in refugee resettlement. Once-a-week I pick up new arrivals from all of the world – Congo, Iraq, Cuba, the list goes on – from the airport and bring them to their new homes. Throughout the rest of my week, I help these new residents of my city access the medical care that they need. I’m not sure I would have applied for this position if it were not for my experiences in Ramat Eliyahu.”


Learn more about the Yahel Social Change Program.

 


2. Jamie Gold, Masa Israel Teaching Fellows 2012-2013 Alumna

 



“As a result of her Masa Israel Teaching Fellows experience, Jamie chose to pursue a career in Jewish education. Upon returning to Los Angeles, Jamie moved into the Moishe House in West L.A. and enrolled in the DeLeT program at Hebrew Union College. “Masa Israel Teaching Fellows is the only reason I was picked for the HUC program,” Jamie says. She believes it gave her the necessary Israel and teaching experiences to be a top-notch Jewish educator.”


Learn more about the Masa Israel Teaching Fellows Program.

 

3. Rachel Pope, MSIH 2011 alumna

 


“Rachel is completing a two year fellowship in Malawi. She is learning how to repair obstetric fistulas and working with the next generation of Malawian residents at the newly created Malawian OB/GYN residency program. Rachel is currently living in Lilongwe, Malawi and working for the government hospital, Kamuzu Central.”

 

Learn more about the The Medical School for International Health (MSIH).

 


4. Ashleigh Talberth, Pardes Insitute of Jewish Studies 2014-2015 Alumna

 


“A serial green-tech entrepreneur, Ashleigh has pioneered initiatives for a broad range of leading companies, startups, and institutions for over 12 years. She currently consults for emerging companies primarily in California and Israel, the world's leading green-tech and startup hot spots.” ("Israelcagreentech." Israelcagreentech. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Mar. 2016.)
 

Learn more about the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies. 

 

eJewish Philanthropy: We Don’t Need a ‘Jewish Peace Corps’, We Already Have One">eJewish Philanthropy: We Don’t Need a ‘Jewish Peace Corps’, We Already Have One

Publish Date: 
March 3, 2016

By Tamar Zilbershatz, Director of Gap and Service Programs

 

We don’t need a ‘Jewish Peace Corps’, we already have one in Israel and around the world.

Instead of creating yet another organization or institution to compete for Jewish millennials’ attention, the Jewish world must leverage and promote the plethora of existing Peace Corps-like opportunities that are offered and subsidized around the world and particularly in Israel. It is extremely important to myself and my colleagues that you and your readers know about all of the service-learning opportunities available to them in Israel. And not just that, but that thousands of Jewish millennials are engaging with Israel not out of anger, but out of a genuine desire for personal growth and professional development.

 

Service to Israel is integral to helping participants of long-term Israel programs to truly experience Israel for all of its beauty and complexity. In exposing them to the challenges and issues facing Israeli society, service and volunteer projects foster participants’ personal connections to the land, the State and its people. They see Israel for themselves, ask difficult questions, form educated and nuanced opinions and learn to navigate uncertainty.

 

Every immersive Israel experience includes social action and community service components, as well as Jewish studies. Whether studying abroad in Be’er Sheva, learning at a yeshiva in Jerusalem or interning at a start-up in Tel Aviv, each participant of a 2-10 month Israel program has a meaningful and eye-opening service experience that informs his or Jewish identity and relationship with Israel.

 

More specifically, gap year and post-college service-learning programs encompass a significant segment of the vast programmatic offerings available in Israel. As I write this piece – and right now, as you read it – more than 1,500 Jewish millennials are living and learning the values of tikkun olam in Israel. They are working directly with disadvantaged Jews and impoverished Israeli Arabs, as well as African refugees and asylum seekers – in both central Israel and the periphery.

 

Youth movement and non-denominational gap year students are Diaspora Jews from around the world who come to Israel for a year of service and self-discovery after graduating high school. They live, volunteer and study in a few different cities throughout their year in Israel, including underprivileged communities like Bat Yam, Yerucham, Kfar Chasidim, and others.

 

College-educated individuals work in underserved elementary and middle schools across Israel, helping Israeli teachers to improve students’ English learning outcomes. They serve Bedouin communities in Rahat and Be’er Sheva and Israeli Arabs in Lod, as well as Ethiopian, former Soviet Union, and other immigrant communities throughout Israel.

 

Other service-learning programs like Solidarity of Nations – Achvat Amim, the Yahel Social Change program, Tikkun Olam in Tel Aviv-Jaffa and Israel Corps – Project TEN are specifically built around the issues of human rights, social justice and environmental activism. Diaspora Jewish participants of these programs work with local nonprofit organizations in various cities and communities. They also engage in renewed dialogue surrounding Zionism in the 21st century with their Israeli peers.

 

For Jews at risk around the world, heavily subsidized Israel programs provide those interested in making Aliyah with a soft-landing. From developing a foundational knowledge of the Hebrew language, to networking and relationship-building, to getting a foot in the door in one’s industry of choice or field of study, long-term Israel experiences serve as a pre-Aliyah immersion for thousands of Jews from places like Ukraine. For those who do not make Aliyah, they return home with extensive leadership skills and experiences and a built-in global network of global Jewish leaders.

 

Post-program research shows that alumni of immersive Israel programs of all ages, who come from across the Jewish spectrum, emerge more connected to their people and more invested in their Jewish identity. They are three times more attached to Israel and twice as engaged and informed about Israel than their peers. Empowered by a transformative, independent experience, alumni volunteer with Israel advocacy groups almost three times more than people who do not participate in similar programs and are 100% more likely to take a leadership role inside or outside the Jewish community.

 

Although long-term Israel programs are not the same scale as the Peace Corps, or maybe Yossi Beilin’s vision, a wide array of existing programs offer Jewish young adults numerous to take part in inter-racial, inter-religious and international humanitarian work in Israel.

 

So before we jump to write off the existing landscape of Israel engagement, perhaps we should take a closer look at the impact currently taking shape.

 

Tamar Zilbershatz serves as Masa Israel Journey’s Director of Gap and Service Programs. You can learn more about Masa Israel Journey’s volunteer programs by visiting MasaIsrael.org, IsraelTeachingFellows.org and PostCollege.MasaIsrael.org.

 

Originally published on eJewish Philanthropy

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